Robert Kuttner

Robert Kuttner is co-founder and co-editor of The American Prospect, and professor at Brandeis University's Heller School. His latest book is Can Democracy Survive Global Capitalism? In addition to writing for the Prospect, he writes for The Huffington Post, The Boston Globe, and the New York Review of Books. 

Follow Bob at his site, robertkuttner.com, and on Twitter. 

Recent Articles

Trump’s Crumbling Wall -- of GOP Political Support

AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin President Donald Trump speaks in New Orleans. T he increasing Republican skittishness about Trump’s wall and the continuing government shutdown offers an instructive preview of how the Trump presidency is likely to end: when key Republican senators decide that Trump is more trouble than he’s worth. What’s new about this crisis is the increasing number of Republican defections. Politically, Trump’s obsession has backfired. His demand for the wall and his holding the rest of the government hostage become more unpopular by the day. The most recent polls show that the public blames Trump more than the Democrats for the shutdown by margins approaching 2–to–1. There are at least seven Republicans in tight re-election races in 2020, and they aren’t happy. They include Cory Gardner of Colorado, Susan Collins of Maine, and Rob Portman of Ohio. Senators Pat Roberts of Kansas, who is retiring, and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska have also expressed exasperation in comments to...

Can Trump Really Use Emergency Powers to Build a Wall?

AP Photo/Alex Brandon, file President Donald Trump waves as he arrives to speak at a rally in Tupelo, Mississippi. P resident Trump has threatened to use his emergency powers as president to build his $5 billion vanity wall. Can he do this? Maybe he can. A series of laws gives extraordinary emergency powers to the president—in a true emergency. One emergency law authorizes the secretary of the army during a presidentially declared emergency to direct troops to help construct “authorized civil works, military construction and civil defense projects that are essential to the national defense.” Another law allows the secretary of defense, to reprogram funds to build necessary military projects, if so directed during a presidentially declared emergency. These laws, however, are in conflict with the Posse Comitatus Act of 1878, which generally prohibits he use of the military on American soil, except in very narrowly specified circumstances. It all turns on whether this is a bona fide...

Republicans Finally Find Major Perpetrators of Ballot Fraud—and It’s Them!

AP Photo/Chuck Burton, File North Carolina congressional candidate Mark Harris speaks to the media during a news conference in Matthews, North Carolina. F or decades, Republicans have been claiming that ballot fraud was endemic. Supposedly, thousands if not millions of people were improperly voting, for Democrats. This was the basis for photo-ID requirements and excessive purges of the voting rolls, and felony penalties for people found to have voted improperly. Any serious person understood that all of this was a cynical smokescreen for depressing the votes of Democrats. The people targeted were from groups inclined to vote Democratic, notably African Americans, Latinos, the foreign born, poor people, and college students. The targeting reached an extreme where in some states gun licenses could be used as photo ID, but not ID cards from state universities much less welfare, food-stamp or Medicaid cards. Serious research found that the actual number of verified improper voting, over...

As Trump Comes Apart, Can Democrats Come Together?

AP Photo/Andrew Harnik House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Senator Chuck Schumer speak to members of the media outside the West Wing of the White House. This article appears in the Winter 2018 issue of The American Prospect. Subscribe here . T he Democrats have much to celebrate. They did better than expected in the House, made notable gains in the states, and Donald Trump is on the ropes. House Democrats are primed to launch several investigations, showing the nation what serious governing and legislative comity look like. It’s possible to be both partisan and respectful of democratic norms. George H.W. Bush, object of extended eulogies for his decency, used his veto pen 44 times, a modern record for a one-term president, yet he displayed a courtesy that further shames Trump. Trump’s moves have increasingly backfired both politically and legally. His efforts to turn a refugee caravan into a national security threat disgusted more voters than they rallied...

Donald Trump and Robert Mueller: The End Game

AP Photo/Andrew Harnik President Donald Trump departs after speaking in Kansas City, Missouri. This article originally appeared at HuffPost. Subscribe here . A t several previous points in Donald Trump ’s presidency, it looked as if he could not possibly survive to the end of his four-year term. Yet Trump always managed to change the subject, his public shrugged, Republicans continued to support him, and Trump rolled merrily on. This time could be different. The stage is now set for what appears to be an inexorable path to impeachment or resignation. Let’s review what special counsel Robert Mueller has on Trump. Based on the most recent combined filings of the special counsel and prosecutors at the U.S. attorney’s office in Manhattan, the evidence is piling up to document the following: 1. In September 2015, Trump personally approved the plan of personal lawyer and longtime fixer Michael Cohen to make high-level contacts with the Russian government to build a Trump Tower in Moscow...

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