Manuel Madrid

Manuel Madrid is a writing fellow at The American Prospect

Recent Articles

Can the House Stop Trump’s Gross Immigration Abuse?

An overdue reform agenda awaits investigations and hearings.

Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/via AP Images When Republican Darrell Issa (right) was chair of the House Oversight Committee under President Obama, he issued more than 100 subpoenas. Incoming Committee Chair Elijah Cummings (left) probably has a few subpoenas of his own he'd like to issue. This article appears in the Winter 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here . W ith the midterm elections over and Democrats back in control of the House, the Trump administration will no longer be able to count on congressional Republicans to protect its nativist agenda. The new House majority comes with committee chairmanships and accompanying subpoena power. Although the prospect of impeachment has been teased, the “I” word that features in the Democratic leadership agenda at present is immigration, which looks to be a priority for various committees. One of the first orders of business will be taking a closer look at the Trump administration’s policy of separating migrant children...

Trump’s New Opportunity Zones Look Great for Investors

Whether they’ll actually help their intended beneficiaries—poverty-stricken neighborhoods—is a lot less clear.

AP Photo/Julio Cortez A man walks by a closed restaurant along Bergen Street in a so-called opportunity zone in Newark, New Jersey. trickle-downers_35.jpg L ike kids before a piñata, investors and real-estate developers have been lining up to cash in on a new suite of tax cuts for investments in low-income areas, known as “opportunity zones.” Now, with the release of much-anticipated guidelines by the Trump administration, the party can finally begin. The opportunity zone program, one of the rare provisions in last year’s Republican tax overhaul to receive some Democratic support, is the latest spin on a decades-old policy intended to attract capital to economically distressed areas by offering a range of financial goodies, such as tax benefits and subsidies. With sufficiently lucrative incentives available, the theory goes, wealthy investors will happily put their dollars into small businesses, local infrastructure, and housing in areas otherwise starved of investment. Sounds like a...

Rick Scott’s Double-Speak on Immigration

The Republicans’ Florida senatorial nominee has one message in his Spanish-language ads and another in his English-language ones.

(AP Photo/John Raoux, File)
(AP Photo/John Raoux, File) Florida Governor Rick Scott speaks at a Republican rally in Orlando on September 6, 2018. F lorida Governor Rick Scott has a Donald Trump problem. Scott is one of a handful of Republican Senate candidates in states with large Hispanic populations working to keep an arm’s-length relationship with the president. While Trump continues to enjoy strong support within the GOP base, his approval ratings remain underwater among Hispanic voters, who made up 18 percent of Florida’s electorate in 2016. The distancing effort is a sudden turnabout for Scott, who was one of Trump’s earliest and most dedicated supporters. Scott endorsed Trump the day after he won the Republican primary in the Sunshine State. The Florida governor also fundraised for Trump, led a pro-Trump super PAC, and even hosted an inaugural party after the New York businessman’s surprise victory in 2016. But the public relationship between the two has grown cold over the past months. The president’s...

Think the GOP Tax Cut Was for the Rich? Actually, It Was for the White and Rich.

At nearly every point on the economic spectrum, a new report documents, it helped whites more than people of color.

(Photo by Olivier Douliery/Abaca Press/Sipa via AP Images)
(Photo by Olivier Douliery/Abaca Press/Sipa via AP Images) Republicans wave to President Trump at an event to celebrate the passage of the 2017 Republican Tax Act on the South Lawn of the White Hosue on December 20, 2017. trickle-downers.jpg T he $1.5 trillion tax cut signed into law last December by President Trump is not only widening the economic gap between the rich and everyone else, but also between white Americans and people of color. That’s according to a new, first-of-its-kind analysis of the 2017 Republican Tax Act by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy (ITEP) and Prosperity Now, a nonprofit advocacy group for low-income households. Using an economic model created by ITEP, the report drills down on the racial implications of the Republicans’ handiwork. The report’s authors found that racial inequities are a feature of the tax law, not a bug—Trump’s tax cuts champion Americans with existing wealth over those struggling to create new wealth. Of the $275 billion in...

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