Gabrielle Gurley

Gabrielle Gurley is The American Prospect’s deputy editor. Her Twitter is @gurleygg, and her email is ggurley@prospect.org.

Recent Articles

Q&A: Straight Talk From Maine on Why Trump Won

A veteran Democratic state lawmaker breaks down how a large swath of a rural blue state went red.

AP Photo/Michael C. York
AP Photo/Michael C. York State Senator-elect at the Maine Democratic Convention in Bangor, Maine. O n Election Day, Maine voters approved five ballot questions that legalized recreational marijuana, authorized a multimillion-dollar transportation bond bill, slapped a flat tax on earners making more than $200,000, changed election rules to allow voters to rank state and federal candidates, and raised the minimum wage. A gun background-check question failed—no surprise in a state with little gun violence and a strong hunting culture. For Maine Democrats, these five referendum victories were the only real bright spots in an election that left them stunned by defeat. It wasn’t supposed to be this way. In 2008 and 2012, Maine went solid blue for Barack Obama. This year, except for a few towns along the Canadian border, Donald Trump captured rural northern and inland Maine, while Hillary Clinton prevailed in the state’s urbanized southern, coastal regions. Under Maine’s apportionment rules...

Trump’s Own Blacks

Ben Carson as Secretary of Education? Farce becomes tragedy.

(Photo: AP/Christian Murdock/The Gazette)
(Photo: AP/Christian Murdock/The Gazette) Ben Carson speaks during a rally on Friday, November 4, 2016, at the Classical Academy in Colorado Springs. D onald Trump’s “What have you got to lose?” appeal did not move African Americans. There’s been some media interest in the significance of the 8 percent of the black vote that Trump gained compared to Mitt Romney’s 7 percent haul in 2012, but a one-percentage-point uptick does not a political realignment make. Hillary Clinton ran away with 88 percent of the black vote, winning 94 percent of black women and 80 percent of black men, winning the overall popular vote only to get crushed by the Electoral College. But the Republicans won’t conduct a post-Romney autopsy this time around, because they threw in their chips with Trump and cashed out beyond their wildest dreams. What can African Americans expect from a Trump administration? Nothing bodes well at this juncture, but one thing bears watching: Under an unreconstructed bigot, there may...

Does Clinton’s Campaign Lack the Human Touch in Black Communities?

The absence of an early, focused voter mobilization campaign may be taking a toll.

AP Photo/Chris O'Meara
AP Photo/Chris O'Meara Supporters chant as they wait for a speech by Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, Tuesday, November 1, 2016, in Dade City, Florida. I n the waning days of the most divisive contest in modern presidential history, early-voting trends suggest that many African Americans voters have checked out of Election 2016. No Democratic candidate would ever be likely to match Barack Obama’s historic success or his ability to turn out black voters (save perhaps Michelle Obama, who has vowed never to run for public office) Hillary Clinton’s equally historic quest to be the first woman president has gotten lost amid the media’s 24/7 coverage of Donald Trump’s daily eruptions. But that’s just one reason why some African American voters are underwhelmed by the prospect of a Clinton presidency. Another fundamental problem is a Democratic ground game that may completely eclipse Republican efforts nationwide, but which pales in comparison to the Democrats’ African...

Want Transit? Get It on the Ballot!

A record number of transportation-related ballot initiatives will be before voters this Election Day.

(Photo: AP/Seth Perlman)
(Photo: AP/Seth Perlman) Construction crews work to build a four-lane highway on Route 29 in Edinburg, Illinois. The state has a constitutional amendment on the ballot this year geared toward preventing transportation funding from being used elsewhere. S ome voters who can’t get there from here may soon be able to. An estimated $200 billion in transportation ballot initiatives go before voters around the country on November 8. The 72 initiatives that will have been put to voters by year’s end represent the highest number of transit ballot questions since the Center for Transportation Excellence began tracking ballot initiatives in 2000. Of those, 44, or about 60 percent, will be decided on Election Day. “Communities are increasingly looking to the ballot box as a tool for transit investment,” says Jason Jordon, the center’s executive director. Transit ballot questions give municipalities the opportunity to get public buy-in (and, in some cases, give politicians a way out of taking a...

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